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I today in solidarity with against [gerchu.phpbbx.de viagra] a vivisection laboratory. And it seems we do have a little something to celebrate, before we plunge into the misery, because the Austrian animal advocates who had been held without charge for so long . Let's celebrate their release and stand in solidarity with imprisoned antivivisectionists by spending some time forcing ourselves to think about the unthinkable things that go on behind closed doors at vivisection labs, thinking about the root causes of those atrocities, and thinking about what we might do to make a difference. Carnival Participants Jasmin, , works for and usually blogs about farmed animal issues but answered the call for carnival participants with ". Gerchu.phpbbx.de viagra " she begins with a recent victory -- the decision by the society of gynecological oncologists to cancel a "hands-on pig lab" -- before going on to look at the rhetoric of welfare used by vivisection profiteers and the failure of welfare legislation to protect animals used in experimentation. Thinking about connections to other issues, Jasmin also provides some facts and links about American Anti-Vivisection Society founder Caroline Earle White gerchu.phpbbx.de viagra, who was also active in the anti-slavery and women's suffrage movements. (White was not alone, by the way -- many early antivivisectionists in the UK and the USA also took action against slavery and for women's rights. It really is all connected. Many of the founders of animal liberationism as such understood that and we need more than ever to remember it now. ) Next up, Deb at , with ". " After sharing some thought-provoking reflections about childhood reactions to animals used in cosmetics testing and space flight experimentation, Deb gets down to the science of it, deploying her own biology degree to show that vivisection is bad science. Never one to miss connections, Deb also talks about the profit angle and the politics of Food and Drug Administration regulations requiring animal testing. In the comments following this post, the discussion veers into Sputnik, Tuskegee, and FDA duplicity. Like Deb -- like so many of us! -- Mary Martin of came to animal rights in part because of exposure to the horrors of vivisection. In her post entitled ", " Mary also shares memories of being awakened to the cruelty of vivisection by means of images -- images she still remembers after 25 years. (The commonality of this theme might tell us something about the power of particular images. ) Mary also notes the profit angle, arguing that we should, in addition to refraining from buying animal products ourselves, push for more research and funding of alternatives to animal experimentation (e. g. , computer modeling and the like). having nightmares about vivisection, something I know happens to lots of animal advocates. That may be one reason why -- this is me talking now, not Neva -- so many of us shy away from antivivisection activism and why so much of that activism is so fierce. I know people who have gone undercover in vivisection labs. Experiences like that change you forever. Neva worked as a researcher on vivisection issues for an animal rights organization and was rocked by that experience, understandably. She also learned a lot about how regulation of vivisection works or, rather, doesn't work. Her post is well-worth reading for that alone. But she goes on to make connections, taking up the implicit challenge in my reference to child sexual abuse:

And there you are, helpless, and all your existence is pain, and you don’t even comprehend why or how, or that there is anything else in the entire world. Amazingly, somewhere in the world, someone is experimenting on animals to try to develop a drug that will make children forget incidents of sexual abuse, or at least make those memories less vivid. Because it’s not about owning your own body, owning your own life, owning your own memories, and finding your own peace, it’s about developing, marketing and selling for profit a pill that someone can swallow to presumably avoid the hard work of living and healing. A pill so you don’t have to go to the therapist. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want any child to hurt or suffer, I just don’t believe a pill fixes that.
Neva goes on to point out that, "even when we avoid prescription medications, buy the bunny-hugger toothpaste and cleanser, our tax dollars still fund vivisection" and to suggest that getting rid of the laws that require animal testing might be a good start. On the subject of what to do about vivisection, Jessica (who doesn't have a blog but who I know does great work with ) posted gerchu.phpbbx.de viagra on the post calling for this carnival. After summarizing the reasons vivisection should be opposed, Jessica surveys some of the reasons many animal advocates have strayed from antivivisection work, offering point-by-point suggestions for countering those forces of inhibition. Definitely worth a read by anybody interested in activist strategy! Speaking of the concerns of poultry, the has a post on ", " reminding everybody that birds are vivisected too and reminding friends of chickens that hens are locked up in lab cages as well as battery cages. The post offers links to comprehensive reports about genetic engineering of chickens and other farmed animals, suggesting that this might be an area of potential coalition with the environmentalists and social justice activists who already oppose other kinds of agricultural genetic engineering. Gary over at is a true friend of chickens, who has supported both United Poultry Concerns and the Eastern Shore Sanctuary. In answer to the call for this carnival, he's offering another one of his famous multi-part series. Part I covers the at two universities in Oregon. Parts II and III will cover "a modest proposal for the National Institutes of Health" and "practical steps your neighbors and co-workers might willingly take to reduce the number of animals harmed and killed in laboratories. " Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss them. Rick at didn't need the prompting of a carnival: He blogs about vivisection every day. I particularly liked his recent post on the "" -- Unnatural lack of empathy. Speaking of which, -- including the dissection of our minds from our emotions. I argue that such dissociations help to explain the matrix of violations that make our neighborhoods so dangerous and our ecosystems so endangered. Speaking of such connections, the Queering Animal Liberation project blog has posted a couple of links concerning . I think that's it. If I missed any entries, let me know and I'll add them right away. Thanks to all who participated in this carnival -- either by writing or by reading! Let's not let it stop with today. Let's keep vivisection in mind, even when we are working on other issues. And, of course, let's always be in solidarity with those who are locked up in vivisection labs or locked up in prisons for trying to unlock those labs!


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