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bhutto banner Benazir Bhutto, 21 June 1953 - 27 December 2007 I spent much of yesterday in a state of stunned incomprehension after awakening to the news of the assassination of Benazir Bhutto in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Even though the threat of her death by violence was clear enough, who was truly shocked and shaken when it acutally happened. The daughter of a deposed Prime Minister murdered by a military dictatorship, Benazir Bhutto came back from exile to challenge a military dictatorship not once but twice. Whatever her personal or political failings might have been, her physical courage and willingness to deploy her own life in the service of a larger goal cannot be denied. From here -- where no politician of her stature stepped forward to challenge the Bush regime's seizure of the apparatus of government in 2000 and where radical opponents of the regime tend to confine themselves to safe pursuits such as marching in circles on empty city streets on Saturdays -- seems pretty admirable. (, I heard an interview with one of Bhutto's close associates here in the States. He said that he and others had repeatedly implored her to use her considerable intelligence, education, and wealth in other ways so as to be able to have a safe and happy life in someplace like Dubai or London rather than returning to face possible death in Pakistan. She told him that the restoration of democracy in Pakistan was her life. Since these were private conversations with a close friend rather than soundbites for the media, I believe that, whatever doubts we may have had about her as a vehicle of democracy or her means of seeking that end, she sincerely believed that to be her life's work. Surely, if her goal were merely more wealth and power, she could have obtained both of those by considerably less dangerous means. ) Rightly or wrongly, Benazir Bhutto embodied the hopes of Pakistan's dispossessed. Their grief, rage, and confusion in the wake of her death radiate beyond national borders to cast a palpable pall over the world today. [popularity of viagra] Popularity of viagra i can feel it. I'll bet this was how it felt in other countries when MLK and RFK were assassinated here. So, As usual, I have a lot of thoughts. Bush and Musharraf are blaming Al Queda and the Taliban, and that might be true but would be awfully convenient for them. Already, on the day of her death, Musharraf -- to whose regime Benazir Bhutto was the greatest threat -- was using the assassination as evidence that his strong-arm style of rule is needed in the context of the "war on terror. " As Bush did with the attacks of 11 September, Musharraf wants to twist his own failure to prevent an attack into justification for giving him even more power. Bhutto knew it would come to this. That's why she left behind messages blaming Musharraf in the event of her death. When her convoy was attacked by a suicide bomber in Karachi upon her initial return to Pakistan earlier this year, she called for forensic experts associated with the FBI and Scotland Yard to be brought into the investigation. That didn't happen. The media and the governments upon whose largess Musharraf depends need to put the pressure on to make sure that happens this time. Even then, it may not be possible to determine whether Musharraf's US-funded security forces were in any way complicit (either by omission or comission) with the assassination. Of course, it's entirely possible that Bhutto was targeted by Islamic fundamentalists without the active complicity of the Musharraf regime. This would not leave Musharraf (or his US backers) blameless. We know for sure that Bhutto made scores of specific security requests that Musharraf ignored. Why would Bhutto be targeted by the fundamentalists? Because it was she, rather than popularity of viagra Musharraf's military, who was their most formidable enemy. And, no, it's not just because she was a female who was widely revered as a leader by devout Muslim men, although that had to be a source of constant aggravation to the Mullahs who insist that women must be not seen and not heard. Pakistani men mourn Benazir Bhutto Bhutto's supporters grieve deeply To understand Bhutto's threat to the Islamic fundamentalists, we must understand that her party, the center-left Pakistan People's Party, really does have the loyalty of common people popularity of viagra, poor people, the kind of people whose disaffection and anger at existing states of affairs are converted by fundamentalists into religious fervor against percieved enemies. (The same thing happens here, although here the grievances felt by fundamentalists tend to be as fictional as their biology books. ) As the writer of an explains, "Pakistan's formidable military establishment seems helpless in dealing with the jihadis operating with impunity against their own people across the country. . . . Benazir was more dangerous to the jihadis than Musharraf. She was a political leader who could fight the battle of ideas, who could tell people why the jihadis were not their friends. That's why she had to be killed. " And that may be why Bush and Mush may have wanted her dead too. Remember, Pakistan is the third biggest customer for the arms manufacturers whose interests Bush serves. More terrorism means more money for them. I know it's hard to think about. I know we want to believe that everybody wants peace. But Benazir Bhutto undoubtedly knew, spent enough time at or near centers of power to know for sure, that munitions manufacturers, military dictators, and other war profiteers like nothing more than patriotic gore. Who killed Benazir Bhutto? Musharraf? Possibly. Terrorists? Certainly. But also all of us who pay taxes that end up in the pockets of arms manufacturers, who "tolerate" truly hate-full political ideologies as long as they call themselves "religions, " who do nothing when the henchmen of war profiteers seize control of our government and then use that power to provoke and exacerbate conflict around the world, who enjoy the corrupt pleasures of globalized capitalism without really risking anything to challenge it. Who was Benazir Bhutto? Was she flawed? Certainly. Corrupt? Quite possibly. Also insanely corageous and hopeful. What we need is for everybody -- all of us flawed children of violence -- to be that hopeful and courageous instead of waiting for leaders to save us. Who killed Benazir Bhutto? All of us. Who was Benazir Bhutto? All of us. The question becomes: Since we already share her flaws, can we use her death to provoke us to recognize and nurture our own insane hope and courage?


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